Key Employer
Insights

About
Biosimilars

A biosimilar is a biologic that is clinically similar in its safety and efficacy and is approved based on a comparision to an approved reference product.4

Mercury Sun Venus Venus

Small-Molecule Drug

Generics: Same structure as reference drug

Biologics

Biosimilars: Highly similar structure to reference biologic

Employer
Implications

Implications

Biosimilars offer a unique opportunity to employers and have a wide variety of benefits:

Implications

Multiple studies discuss the cost benefits of biosimilars to the healthcare system as well as employers:

Take
Action

The National Alliance of Healthcare Purchaser Coalitions provided steps for employers to “influence change that will ultimately lead to more options for employees and their dependents who are dealing with diseases like cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, diabetes, multiple sclerosis, kidney disease, and severe psoriasis."14

Resources

resources

Employer Brief

Biosimilars: Employer
Opportunities Brief

resources

Trends Report

Biosimilars Update:
2019 Report

resources

Amgen Biosimilars Website

Biosimilars: Experience
That Can't Be Replicated

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Benefit Design Strategies
Coming Soon

References: 1. National Business Group on Health. Press release. https://www.businessgrouphealth.org/news/nbgh-news/press-releases/press-release-details/?ID=348. Accessed Sept 12, 2019. 2. US Food and Drug Administration. Biosimilars and interchangeable products. https://www.fda.gov/drugs/biosimilars/biosimilar-and-interchangeable-products. Accessed September 12, 2019. 3. Winegarden W. Impediments to a stronger biosimilars market: an infliximab case study. Pacific Research Institute. 2018;1:1-28. 4. US Food and Drug Administration. What is a Biosimilar? https://www.fda.gov/media/108905/download. Accessed September 12, 2019. 5. Dukes MNG, Haaijer-Ruskamp FM, Joncheere CP, et al. Experiences with generics. In: Drugs and Money - Prices, Affordability and Cost Containment. Burke, VA: IOS Press lnc.;2003:101-110. 6. American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network. Understanding biologic medicines from the cancer patient perspective. https://secure.fightcancer.org/site/DocServer/ACSCAN-Biosimilars-Primer.pdf. Accessed September 12, 2019. 7. Camacho LH, Frost CP, Abella E, et al. Biosimilars 101: considerations for U.S. oncologists in clinical practice. Cancer Med. 2014;3(4):889-899. 8. Aspirin Prescribing Information, Bayer. 9. Humalog® (insulin lispro injection) Prescribing Information [revised 2017], Eli Lilly. 10. Humatrope® [somatropin (rDNA ORIGIN)] Prescribing Information [revised 2016], Eli Lilly. 11. Taltz® (ixekizumab) Prescribing Information [revised 2017], Eli Lilly. 12. IMS Institute for Healthcare Informatics. Delivering on the potential of biosimilar medicines: the role of functioning competitive markets. https://www.medicinesforeurope.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/IMS-Institute-Biosimilar-Report-March-2016-FINAL.pdf. Accessed September 12, 2019. 13. Mulcahy AW, Hlavka JP, Case SR. Biosimilar cost savings in the United States: initial experience and future potential. RAND Health Q. 2018;7(4):3. 14. National Alliance of Healthcare Purchaser Coalitions. The value of biosimilars: improving treatment access and lowering costs. Action brief. https://higherlogicdownload.s3.amazonaws.com/NAHPC/3d988744-80e1-414b-8881-aa2c98621788/UploadedImages/The_Value_of_Biosimilars.pdf. Accessed September 12, 2019.